Safe & Sound

 SkateXchange has systems in place to make your dealings on our site as safe as possible. The site is also monitored in the background too so you are being looked after by both people and software.

Despite this, there are risks when trading in any way online and you too should use both caution and common sense. The latest skates, brand new, for under half the usual price is unlikely to happen. If it seems too good to be true then it probably is!

These Safe & Sound articles are here to help you and be a point of reference when buying or selling on SkateXchange.co.uk or any other website.

If there is something not covered in the following articles that you feel should be then please use the contact page to get in contact.

Before you sell or buy there are some things you can do, or be aware of, to help ensure a positive trading experience:

If you receive a mail asking you how much you'll sell your item for (without referring to it by name) or offering to pay over the top - beware! The same person will usually ask you to contact them away from the SkateXchange site or the Ice Rink

Never give out any financial information (bank account details, SkateXchange or PayPal login info, etc) and avoid deals that involve not meeting at a location at the Ice Rink

Never send money by Western Union or MoneyGram or any other wire service - anyone who asks you to do so is probably a scammer!

PayPal emails saying money is on the way are fake. PayPal put funds immediately into your account. If the funds are not there, then they have not been sent!

Remember, the SkateXchange system has been built for visibility. If you buy or sell something through the SkateXchange site without using the SkateXchange system and messaging function then we have no visibility of the transaction and will only be able to give limited assistance should you have a problem.

When SkateXchange introduced the ability to advertise and sell on the site we saw it as a service that should be local with members, meeting face to face at the Ice Rink at a specified time and place. By meeting locally people can see the item, pay for it and take it away with them there and then. If it is not suitable for them they can walk away.

If someone asks to give you an upfront payment or deposit before you meet, beware! If you are being paid by a secure method such as bank transfer or PayPal make sure the funds are cleared in your account before letting your goods go.

Use caution and common sense when meeting what is effectively a stranger. Only meet at the Ice Rink at the agreed time and location.

We recommend you read our Scam Watch article and, if for any reason, you feel uncomfortable about a deal then do not go ahead with it.

Finally, and we have said it many times before, use your common sense. If it seems too good to be true then it probably is!

When SkateXchange introduced the ability to advertise and sell on the site we saw it as a service that should be local with members, meeting face to face at the Ice Rink at a specified time and place. By meeting locally people can see the item, pay for it and take it away with them there and then. If it is not suitable for them they can walk away.

If someone asks for an upfront payment or deposit before you meet, then show caution. If you do decide to send a deposit for an item you have not yet seen make sure you use a secure method.

Use caution and common sense when meeting what is effectively a stranger. Only meet at the Ice Rink at the agreed time and location.

Carrying large sums of money in public is not good practice. If the item you are hoping to buy is expensive we recommend you view it first. Once you are happy to go ahead with the purchase you can either go to a bank and withdraw the funds or arrange a second meeting.

We recommend you read our Scam Watch article and, if for any reason, you feel uncomfortable about a deal then do not go ahead with it.

Finally, and we have said it many times before, use your common sense. If it seems too good to be true then it probably is!

We have listed some of the most common online scams below for you:

Being asked to pay by money transfer services such as Western Union, Ukash or MoneyGram.

These services were developed to send money to friends and family scattered around the world and not for sending money to strangers. Fraudsters love these services because they are largely untraceable once they have your money! Fraudsters have many ways of tricking you into using these services. The most common trick is to ask you to prove that you have money by sending some to a friend or relative via one of these services and show them the receipt. Once they have the tracking number from your receipt they collect your money with ease. If a seller asks you to use these services the alarm bells should start ringing and you should exercise extreme caution.

Payment or protection services by from well-known sites such as eBay or PayPal.

An email arrives from eBay, PayPal or similar offering you buyer protection or an online payment system. This is often in connection with a transaction from someone you’ve met online. Alternatively, the buyer or seller may suggest you use a payment or protection service from one of these providers and sends you to a link and instructions to follow. These are fake and are known as SPOOF or PHISHING emails. SkateXchange has no form of payment scheme or protection and does not offer any guarantee or compensation schemes. Although other companies offer payment or protection schemes, the email or instructions you get will not be genuine. If you receive an email that is supposedly from a company offering a service, we suggest you always go directly to the company’s official website and look for details of the service published there.

Cheque overpayment.

This is a very plausible favourite! A potential buyer sends you a cheque for a higher value than that of the item you are selling. They then ask for the overpayment to be given back to them or a third party. In these cases, the cheque will clear into your bank account, only to be reversed weeks later. At this point, the bank or building society will take the full cheque amount back out of your account. At the end, you are out of pocket for the value of the item they have taken and cash amount you gave back as the difference.

Fake escrow sites.

A buyer or seller insists on using an escrow service to complete the transaction. These escrow websites often may look very official but are, in fact, run by fraudsters themselves. They get your money and you never see the item.

An email from SkateXchange (or another company) asking for your personal details such as logins, passwords, PayPal or credit card details.

An email arrives from SkateXchange or another company and asks that you reply or follow a link to provide personal information. These are completely fake and are known as SPOOF or PHISHING mails. Any emails that combine urgency and a request for personal details should be treated with great caution, regardless of who appears to have sent them. It is easy to create fake websites and pages from them. No reputable company or entity would ever send you a mail like this! If you receive an email alleging to be from SkateXchange, and asking for your personal information, don’t follow any links provided in the email. Report the issue to SkateXchange using the contact form.

You can find more information on scams and fraudsters at the following sites:

ACTION FRAUD - http://www.actionfraud.police.uk/types_of_fraud

METROPOLITAN POLICE FRAUD ALERT - http://content.met.police.uk/Site/fraudalert

You can report fraud here:

CRIMESTOPPERS - http://www.crimestoppers-uk.org/fraud